What If You Do Not Fit the Typical Recruiting Mold?

by

Recruits who are not top national recruits must be creative and find different ways to get What If You Do Not Fit the Typical Recruiting Mold?ahead in their recruitment. They should start by finding the right college, making sure they are academically eligible to play at their target division level, and making contact with college coaches and college recruiters so they can begin to get their name out there to college coaches.

Have a goal, but understand your limits

It happens often; recruits get set on competing at the division I level and only work on contacting division I coaches. These recruits get frustrated when they are met with no replies from college athletic staffs, and get even more discouraged when they are unable to secure a spot on a college team by the time their senior year season is over.

In most cases

We normally interpret the above scenario as players aiming too high, when clearly they do not have the ability and skills to compete with other NCAA division I athletes. This happens more often than not. All competitive athletes want to get found by larger, well-known universities and want to have a chance to play in front of a national audience. Who can blame them- for most student-athletes, all they know is NCAA division I sports.

Don’t think we are trying to discourage you from playing at the DI level. If you believe you have what it takes, then by all means you should work hard to meet your goal.

One athlete who did not give up

University of Central Arkansas, linebacker Seth Allison has a unique recruiting story. Coming out of high school he received very little offers to play. He was not the biggest guy on the line; something he attributes to helping him become successful. Now looking back, he is able to say, “just because someone doesn’t have certain physical attributes doesn’t mean he can’t play.” Allison never let his size matter because he knew his skills would take him far.

He was not going to stop

Allison was given the chance to prove himself as a walk-on at UCA. He jumped at this opportunity. After his freshman year as a red-shirt he later went on to earn titles such as leading tackler, All-American and UCA male athlete of the year. The 2012 season is Allison’s last, and he is predicted to once again be named an All-American.

From walk- on to the coach’s dream player. Allison is now a leader on the field and in the classroom. This is a great story of a player who did not get a lot of looks, but was willing to give it his all. If you have the dream to make it somewhere, then you need to be prepared to give it your all.

If you have any questions about walking-on or getting in contact with college recruiters than leave your comment below and connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.


Are you ready for the NEXT STEP!