One Thing They Don’t Tell You About Recruiting: Be Patient

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Be PatientPatience is a Virtue

There are lots of things that can derail a season–transfer, injury, burn-out. For the college-bound athlete trying to earn an athletic scholarship, this can be a time to learn patience.

The Tim Williams Story

Tim Williams is a great example. After recording 22 sacks his freshman season at his Louisiana high school he decided to transfer schools. Louisiana high school rules stipulate that a transfer has to sit out the season.

It was a hard pill to swallow for Williams. He loved his football. Now the Division I recruit, who had 15.5 sacks as a junior, has learned to appreciate the game that much more for being forced to sit out his sophomore season.
What else did Williams learn from that lost season? He learned that even when you are not on the field you can can contribute by supporting your teammates.

Injuries and Recruiting

How does an injury affect the athlete who is being recruited? If it’s not a serious career-threatening injury most schools will continue their pursuit while others will back off. This can be a good litmus test to see which schools are serious about your recruitment. Is the coach genuinely concerned about your welfare?

And what about teaching patience? Yes, one of the toughest things for a talented young athlete is to sit and watch others play. You can, however, develop a better understanding of the game by sitting on the bench and watching the action unfold.

Feeling Trapped in the Sports Cycle

When that hard-earned patience starts to burn out it is important that athletes and parents recognize the signs and symptoms. For instance, when young athletes start to feel entrapped in the sports cycle and not in control of their own destiny this can manifest in a variety of ways, all of which signal the athlete may need some time off.

Engaged athletes suffer less from burn out. When we take away the fun factor from sports it becomes a chore and this is never a good thing.

If a young athlete runs out of patience it may be a sign that some rest is necessary. Four to six weeks away from a sport can be a great cure for burnout and a welcome refresher for worn-out patience.

Angelina College Athletic Recruiting.

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